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GROWvember FALL PLANT SALE:  Sat., Nov. 4 at Mead Garden
Saturday, Nov. 4th GROWvember FALL PLANT SALE
The Great DUCK!
Next Great Duck Derby Sat. April 22, 2017
Registration Open Now
Young Naturalist Summer Camp
RSVP today
Thank you to all who made Mead's Anniversary party a success!
You can borrow binoculars!
OAS led birding walks 5 Saturdays in October
Weddings
Weddings

News

Volunteer profile: Nancy Tyree

 

Back in the day, Nancy Tyree recalls, she would escape to Mead Garden at lunch time to relax in nature and rejuvenate before having to go back to work -- and sometimes find herself returning a little late! Retired since 2007, Nancy still comes to the garden regularly to relax, now as a Garden volunteer.   

Air Potato Leaf Beetles released in Mead Botanical Garden

In early August, 2014, 200 air potato leaf beetles were intentionally released in Mead Garden in an effort to combat the invasive air potato vine. 

Air potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) is considered one of Florida’s most invasive exotic species due to its aggressive growth habit. It is an herbaceous, perennial twining vine that can grow up 8 inches per day and to over 70 feet in length. Its leaves are broad and heart-shaped, and it produces many potato-like tubers from which new vines grow. 

Volunteer Profile: Susan League

The beautiful pops of color seen at the entrance to the Community Garden are thanks to the ongoing work of Susan League, devoted garden volunteer and MBG Board Member. Susan also deserves tremendous credit for the dozens upon dozens of hours she spends planting and tending beds in the Legacy Garden, working on various horticultural projects, and maintaining the expanding collection of camellias.

In Bloom: Partridge pea

Partridge pea (Chamaecrista fasciculata) blooms from summer through late fall, attracting mostly bees and butterflies, although ants are also attracted to its nectar glands. It is the host plant to several species of butterfly, including the gray hairstreak (Strymon melinus) and cloudless sulfur (Phoebis sennae), and its seeds are consumed by birds and other wildlife. 

Come see our new staghorn ferns

A special thank you to Laurie Heatley and her family for their in-kind donations of Platyceriums, also known as staghorn ferns, to the Legacy Garden. Their uniquely shaped fronds can be seen hanging from the large oak trees to the left as you enter the garden from S. Denning Drive.

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by Dr. Radut